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The Batman

There’s a lot to like about it, there’s a lot to dislike too. Overall I think it’s a pretty solid Batman film, and if nothing else it’s a huge improvement on the DCEU portrayal of the character. I’m not sure I’d place this anywhere near the Burton or Nolan films, or even Joker, but it’s really refreshing in the context of the last few years of Batman films not being very good. My biggest criticism I suppose is that it doesn’t exactly do anything new. Depending on which films you count and which you don’t, there’s been between 10-15 Batman films in my lifetime and I’m not sure this did anything all that different to any of them. I’m ready for another leap like the one between the 1966 and the 1989 Batman, but this was really just a good version of the stuff we’ve seen multiple times before. 

There’s a lot going on, so much so that even at a three hour runtime I thought it could’ve benefited from an extra hour or so. Every character has something going on, which is good, but there isn’t much space to breathe and as a result a lot of it feels underdeveloped. That said, it does make the film feel really brisk. In a way, it plays out more like the start of a miniseries than a standalone film. Maybe that’s intentional and this will become a long series of films, though. 

One thing I absolutely loved in this is the cinematography. It’s a beautiful film, and quite a few times I found myself just looking around the screen and taking it all in. Some of the scenes towards the end which I won’t spoil were just really nice to look at, and almost felt nostalgic because of the use of practical effects rather than relying on CGI to cut costs. Certainly worth seeing in theatres while it’s still there.

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